BOOKS: PSYCHOLOGICAL THRILLERS

It’s no secret that I love reading psychological thrillers. In fact, it’s turned into a bit of an obsession lately. The only downside to this is that it can make reading anything other than psychological thrillers really difficult. I’ve taken a little break to read the Harry Potter series again and now I’m reading “Captain Corelli’s Mandolin,” by Louis de Bernières. Harry Potter is so easy to read because, let’s face it, how can you not love Harry Potter?! But I’m not joking when I say that it took me almost 2 weeks to get into Captain Corelli’s Mandolin. I had to start reading it with a completely different mindset than I would read a psychological thriller. There is no mystery to figure out, but my brain was constantly trying to do just that. I’m really loving Captain Corelli’s Mandolin, by the way. Now that I’ve gotten into it, I can’t put it down! I’m sure it’ll be done by the end of the day.  Continue reading

BOOK REVIEW: “BAND OF BROTHERS,” BY STEPHEN E. AMBROSE

cvr9780743224543_9780743224543_hr“As good a rifle company as any in the world, Easy Company, 506th Airborne Division, U.S. Army, kept getting the tough assignements – responsible for everything from parachuting into France early D-Day morning to the capture of Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest at Berchtesgaden. In Band of Brothers, Ambrose tells of the men in this brave unit who fought, went hungry, froze, and died, a company that took 150 percent casualties and considered the Purple Heart a badge of office. Drawing on hours of interviews with survivors as well as the soldiers’ journals and letters, Stephen Ambrose recounts the stories, often in the men’s own words, of these American heroes.

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BOOK REVIEW: “GO SET A WATCHMAN,” BY HARPER LEE

a1rbzedgc0lFrom Harper Lee comes a landmark new novel set two decades after her beloved Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, To Kill a Mockingbird. Maycomb, Alabama. Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch–“Scout”–returns home from New York City to visit her aging father, Atticus. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise’s homecoming turns bittersweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt. Featuring many of the iconic characters from To Kill a Mockingbird, Go Set a Watchman perfectly captures a young woman, and a world, in a painful yet necessary transition out of the illusions of the past–a journey that can be guided only by one’s conscience. Written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman imparts a fuller, richer understanding and appreciation of Harper Lee. Here is an unforgettable novel of wisdom, humanity, passion, humor and effortless precision–a profoundly affecting work of art that is both wonderfully evocative of another era and relevant to our own times. It not only confirms the enduring brilliance of To Kill a Mockingbird, but also serves as its essential companion, adding depth, context and new meaning to an American classic.

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BOOK REVIEW: “A TIME TO KILL,” BY JOHN GRISHAM

“The life of a ten-year-old girl is shattered by two drunken and 9780736689120remorseless young men. The mostly white town reacts with shock and horror at the inhuman crime. Until her black father acquires an assault rifle and takes matters into his hands.

For ten days, as burning crosses and the crack of sniper fire spread through the streets of Clanton, the nation sits spellbound as young defense attorney Jake Brigance struggles to save his client’s life…and then his own.”

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BOOKS: MY FAVOURITES SO FAR

I’ve always been a book worm and am thankful to have inherited my Mum’s speed reading capabilities. This means that I can read a ridiculous amount of books in a short period of time. On average, I read 3 books a week, and that’s while living a “normal” life of cleaning, cooking, working, prepping for work, social life, etc. During the summer, I’ve been known to read a book a day. Now this isn’t a bad hobby to have, but it sure does get expensive because I insist on buying all of my books. A lot of people have tried to convince me to get a library card and just borrow my books, but I can’t bring myself to do it. I love the smell of a new book and I really like re-reading books. I also like the fact that I can share my books with friends and then we can talk about them after. I think they probably like that I buy all my books too!  Continue reading

BOOK REVIEW: ‘THE ISLAND,’ by VICTORIA HISLOP

On the brink of a life-changing decision, Alexis Fielding longs to find out about her mother’s past.island But Sofia had never spoken of it. All she admits to is growing up in a small Cretan village before moving to London. When Alexis decides to visit Crete, however, Sofia gives her daughter a letter to take to an old friend, and promises that through her she will learn more.

Arriving in Plaka, Alexis is astonished to see that it lies a stone’s throw from the tiny, deserted island of Spinalonga – Greece’s former leper colony. Then she finds Fontini, and at last hears the story that Sofia has buried all her life: the tale of her great-grandmother Eleni and her daughters, and a family rent by tragedy, war and passion. She discovers how intimately she is connected with the island, and how secrecy holds them all in its powerful grip…

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘THE NIGHTINGALE,’ by KRISTIN HANNAH

In love we find out who we want to be. In war we find out who we are.

FRANCE, 1939

In the quiet village of Carriveau, Vianne Mauriac says good-bye to her husband, Antoine, as he heads for the Front. She doesn’t believe that the Nazis will invade 81j3rfXRwmLFrance… but invade they do, in droves of marching soldiers, in caravans of trucks and tanks, in planes that fill the skies and drop bombs upon the innocent. When a German captain requisitions Vianne’s home, she and her daughter must live with the enemy or lose everything. Without food or money or hope, as danger escalated all around them, she is forced to make one impossible choice after another to keep her family alive.

Vianne’s sister, Isabelle, is a rebellious eighteen-year-old, searching for purpose with all the reckless passion of youth. While thousands of Parisians march into the unknown terrors or war, she meets Gaëtan, a partisan who believes the French can fight the Nazis from within France, and she falls in love as only the young can…completely. But when he betrays her, Isabelle joins the Resistance and never looks back, risking her life time and again to save others.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘P.S. I LOVE YOU,’ by CECELIA AHERN

51-dMaLEKKL._SX328_BO1,204,203,200_Some people wait their whole lives to find their soul mates.

But not Holly and Gerry. Childhood sweethearts, they could finish each other’s sentences. No one could imagine them without each other.

When Gerry dies, Holly is devastated. But Gerry has left her a bundle of notes, one for each month of her year, each signed PS, I love you. 

As the notes are opened, the man who knows Holly better than anyone teaches her that life goes on. With some help from friends and family, Holly laughs, cries and finds that life is for living – but it helps if there’s an angel watching over you.

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